Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Organization and Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

v3.19.1
Organization and Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2019
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Nature of Business and Organization
Nature of Business and Organization
KEMET Corporation, which together with its subsidiaries is referred to herein as “KEMET” or the “Company” is a leading manufacturer of tantalum capacitors, multilayer ceramic capacitors, film capacitors, electrolytic capacitors, paper capacitors and solid aluminum capacitors, and Electro-Magnetic Compatible ("EMC") devices, sensors, and actuators. The Company is headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, Florida and has manufacturing plants and distribution centers located in the United States, Mexico, Europe and Asia. Additionally, the Company has wholly-owned foreign subsidiaries which primarily provide sales support for KEMET’s products in foreign markets.
KEMET is organized into three reportable segments: the Solid Capacitor Reportable Segment (“Solid Capacitors”), the Film and Electrolytic Reportable Segment (“Film and Electrolytic”) and the Electro-Magnetic, Sensors, and Actuators Reportable Segment ("MSA"). Each reportable segment is responsible for the operations of certain manufacturing sites as well as related research and development efforts.
Basis of Presentation
Basis of Presentation
Certain amounts for the Consolidated Statements of Operations for fiscal years 2018 and 2017 have been revised to conform with the fiscal year 2019 presentation.
Principles of Consolidation
Principles of Consolidation
The accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company include the accounts of its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. Investment in entities in which the Company can exercise significant influence, but does not own a majority equity interest or otherwise control, are accounted for using the equity method and are included as equity method investments on the consolidated balance sheets.
Cash Equivalents
Cash Equivalents
Cash equivalents of $60.7 million and $83.9 million at March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, consist of money market accounts and certificates of deposits with original terms of three months or less. The Company considers all liquid debt instruments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents.
Inventories
Inventories
Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. The Company maintains reserves for excess and slow-moving inventory to reflect a carrying amount for inventory that is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. The inventory reserve is an estimate and is adjusted based on slow moving and excess inventory, historical shipments, customer forecasts and backlog, and technology developments.
Raw materials and tool crib obsolescence reserves are based on usage over one and two years, respectively, and the Company maintains reserves for raw materials and tool cribs that exceed these ages. Finished goods obsolescence reserves are either based on product age limits determined by market requirements, and/or based on excess quantities that exceed product orders and historical product sales.
Inventory costs include material, labor and manufacturing overhead and most inventory costs are determined by the “first-in, first-out” (“FIFO”) method. For tool crib, a component of the Company’s raw material inventory, cost is determined under the average cost method. The Company has consigned inventory at certain customer locations totaling $9.5 million and $8.1 million at March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.
Property, Plant and Equipment
Property, Plant and Equipment
Property, plant, and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation is calculated principally using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets. Leasehold improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the shorter of the estimated useful lives of the assets or the terms of the respective leases. Maintenance costs are expensed and expenditures for renewals and improvements are generally capitalized. Upon sale or retirement of property and equipment, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed, and any gain or loss is recognized. A long-lived asset classified as held for sale is initially measured and reported at the lower of its carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell. Long-lived assets to be disposed of other than by sale are classified as held and used until the long-lived asset is disposed of. Depreciation expense, including amortization of capital leases, was $46.7 million, $45.5 million and $35.0 million for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.
The Company evaluates long-lived assets for impairment whenever certain events or changes in circumstances may indicate that the recoverability of the carrying amount of property, plant, and equipment should be assessed, including, among others, a significant decrease in market value, a significant change in the business climate in a particular market, or a current period operating or cash flow loss combined with historical losses or projected future losses. Reviews are regularly performed to determine whether facts and circumstances exist which indicate the carrying amount of assets may not be recoverable. If any impairment indicators are determined to exist, the Company assesses the recoverability of its assets by comparing the projected undiscounted net cash flows associated with the related asset or group of assets over their remaining lives against their respective carrying amounts. If it is determined that the book value of a long-lived asset or asset group is not recoverable, an impairment loss would be calculated equal to the excess of the carrying amount of the long-lived asset over its fair value. The Company must make certain assumptions as to the future cash flows to be generated by the underlying assets. Those assumptions include the amount of volume increases, average selling price decreases, anticipated cost reductions, and the estimated remaining useful life of the equipment. Future changes in assumptions may negatively impact future valuations. Fair market value is based on the discounted cash flows that the assets will generate over their remaining useful lives or other valuation techniques. See Note 8, “(Gain) loss on write down and disposal of long-lived assets” for further discussion of property, plant and equipment impairment charges.
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets
Goodwill and other intangible assets with indefinite useful lives are not amortized but are subject to annual impairment tests during the fourth quarter of each fiscal year and when otherwise warranted. The Company evaluates its goodwill on a reporting unit basis, which requires the Company to estimate the fair value of the reporting unit. The impairment test involves a comparison of the fair value of each reporting unit, with the corresponding carrying amounts. If the reporting unit’s carrying amount exceeds its fair value, then an indication exists that the reporting unit’s goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives may be impaired. The impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying value of the reporting unit’s goodwill being measured exceeds its implied fair value. The implied fair value of goodwill is the excess of the fair value of the reporting unit over the sum of the amounts assigned to identified net assets. As a result, the implied fair value of goodwill is generally the residual amount that results from subtracting the value of net assets, including all tangible assets and identified intangible assets, of the reporting unit’s fair value. The Company determines the fair value of its reporting units using an income-based, discounted cash flow (“DCF”) analysis, and market-based approaches (Guideline Publicly Traded Company Method and Guideline Transaction Method) which examine transactions in the marketplace involving the sale of the stocks of similar publicly owned companies, or the sale of entire companies engaged in operations similar to KEMET. The Company evaluates the value of its other indefinite-lived intangible assets (trademarks) using an income-based, relief from royalty analysis. In addition to the previously described reporting unit valuation techniques, the Company’s goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives impairment assessment also considers the Company’s aggregate fair value based upon the value of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock.
The impairment review of goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives are subjective and involve the use of estimates and assumptions. Estimates of business enterprise fair value use discounted cash flow and other fair value appraisal models and involve making assumptions for future sales trends, market conditions, growth rates, cost reduction initiatives and cash flows for the next several years. Future changes in assumptions may negatively impact future valuations.
Equity Method Investment
Equity Method Investments
Investments and ownership interests are accounted for under the equity method of accounting if the Company has the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control, over the entity. Investments accounted for under the equity method are initially recorded at cost, and the difference between the basis of the Company’s investment and the underlying equity in the net assets of the company at the investment date, is amortized over the lives of the related assets that gave rise to the difference. The Company’s share of earnings or losses under the equity method investments and basis difference amortization is reported in the consolidated statements of operations as “Equity income (loss) from equity method investments.” The Company reviews its investments and ownership interests accounted for under the equity method of accounting for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate a loss in the value of the investment may be other than temporary.
Deferred Income Taxes
Deferred Income Taxes
The Company accounts for income taxes under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the fiscal years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. The Company periodically evaluates its net deferred tax assets based on an assessment of historical performance, ability to forecast future events, and the likelihood that the Company will realize the benefits through future taxable income. Valuation allowances are recorded to reduce the net deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. The Company makes certain estimates and judgments in the calculation for the provision for income taxes, in the resulting tax liabilities, and in the recoverability of deferred tax assets. All deferred tax assets are reported as noncurrent in the Consolidated Balance Sheets.
Stock-based Compensation
Stock-based Compensation
Stock-based compensation for stock options is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The Black-Scholes model considers volatility in the price of the Company’s stock, the risk-free interest rate, the estimated life of the equity-based award, the closing market price of the Company’s stock on the grant date and the exercise price. The estimates utilized in the Black-Scholes calculation involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management judgment. The Company's stock options were fully expensed during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2017. Upon adoption of Accounting Standard Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-09, Compensation Stock-Compensation, the Company elected to discontinue estimating forfeitures. Stock-based compensation cost for restricted stock is measured based on the closing fair market value of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant. The Company recognizes stock-based compensation cost for arrangements with cliff vesting as expense ratably on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period. The Company recognizes stock-based compensation cost for arrangements with graded vesting as expense on an accelerated basis over the requisite service period.
Concentrations of Credit and Other Risks
Concentrations of Credit and Other Risks
The Company sells to customers globally. Credit evaluations of its customers’ financial condition are performed periodically, and the Company generally does not require collateral from its customers. There were no customers’ accounts receivable balances exceeding 10% of gross accounts receivable at March 31, 2019 or March 31, 2018.
Consistent with industry practice, the Company utilizes electronics distributors for a large percentage of its sales. Electronics distributors are an effective means to distribute the products to end-users. For fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018, and 2017, net sales to electronics distributors accounted for 42.2%, 39.2% and 46.8%, respectively, of the Company’s total net sales.
Foreign Subsidiaries
Foreign Subsidiaries
The Company translates the assets and liabilities of its foreign subsidiaries from their respective functional currencies to U.S. dollars at the appropriate spot rates as of the balance sheet date. Generally, our foreign subsidiaries use the local currency as their functional currency. Changes in the carrying value of these assets and liabilities attributable to fluctuations in spot rates are recognized as a component of equity in accumulated other comprehensive income ("AOCI"). Results of operations accounts are translated using average exchange rates for the year.
Assets and liabilities denominated in a currency that is different from a reporting entity's functional currency must first be remeasured from the applicable currency to the legal entity's functional currency. The effect of this remeasurement process is recognized in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Comprehensive income (loss) consists of net income, foreign currency translation gains (losses), post-retirement and defined benefit plan adjustments including those adjustments which result from changes in net prior service credit and actuarial gains (losses), equity interest in investee’s other comprehensive income (loss), gains (losses) on foreign exchange contracts, and gains (losses) on the excluded component of fair value hedges. Comprehensive income is presented in the Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss).
Stock Warrant
Fair Value Measurement
Fair Value Measurement
The Company utilizes three levels of inputs to measure the fair value of (a) nonfinancial assets and liabilities that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the Company’s consolidated financial statements on a recurring basis (at least annually) and (b) all financial assets and liabilities. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.
The first two inputs are considered observable and the last is considered unobservable. The levels of inputs are as follows:
Level 1—Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2—Inputs other than Level 1 that are observable, either directly or indirectly, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.
Level 3—Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.
Revenue Recognition
Revenue Recognition
The Company recognizes revenue under the guidance provided in ASC 606. Consistent with the terms of ASC 606, the Company records revenue on product sales in the period in which the Company satisfies its performance obligation by transferring control over a product to a customer. The amount of revenue recognized reflects the consideration the Company expects to receive in exchange for transferring products to a customer. The Company has elected the practical expedient under ASC 606-10-32-18 and does not consider the effects of a financing component on the promised amount of consideration because the period between when the Company transfers a product to a customer and when the customer pays for that product is one year or less. As performance obligations are expected to be fulfilled in one year or less, the Company has elected the practical expedient under ASC 606-10-50-14 and has not disclosed information relating to remaining performance obligations.
The Company sells its products to distributors, original equipment manufacturers (“OEM”), and electronic manufacturing services providers (“EMS”), and the sales price may include adjustments for sales discounts, price adjustments, and sales allowances. The Company has elected the practical expedient under ASC 606-10-10-4 and evaluates these sales-related adjustments on a portfolio basis. The principle forms of these adjustments include:
Inventory price protection and ship-from stock and debit (“SFSD”) programs,
Distributor rights of returns,
Sales allowances, and
Limited assurance warranties
The Company's inventory price protection and SFSD programs provide authorized distributors with the flexibility to meet marketplace prices by allowing them, upon a pre-approved case-by-case basis, to adjust their purchased inventory cost to correspond with current market demand. KEMET's SFSD program is specific to certain distributors within the Americas and EMEA regions. Requests for SFSD adjustments are considered on an individual basis, require a pre-approved cost adjustment quote from their local KEMET sales representative, and apply only to a specific customer, part, specified special price amount, specified quantity, and are only valid for a specific period of time. To estimate potential SFSD adjustments corresponding with current period sales, KEMET records a sales reserve based on historical SFSD credits, distributor inventory levels, and certain accounting assumptions, all of which are reviewed quarterly.
Select distributors have the right to return a certain portion of their purchased inventory to KEMET from the previous fiscal quarter. The Company estimates future returns based on historical return patterns and records a corresponding right of return asset and refund liability as a component of the line items, “Inventories, net” and “Accrued expenses,” respectively, on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The Company also offers volume-based rebates on a case-by-case basis to certain customers in each of the Company’s sales channels.
The Company's sales allowances are recognized as a reduction in the line item “Net sales” on the Consolidated Statements of Operations, while the associated reserves are included in the line item “Accounts receivable, net” on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. Estimates used in determining sales allowances are subject to various factors. This includes, but is not limited to, changes in economic conditions, pricing changes, product demand, inventory levels in the supply chain, the effects of technological change, and other variables that might result in changes to the Company’s estimates.
The Company provides a limited assurance warranty on products that meet certain specifications to select customers. The warranty coverage period is generally limited to one year for United States based customers and a length of time commensurate with regulatory requirements or industry practice outside the United States. A warranty cannot be purchased by the customer separately and, as a result, product warranties are not considered to be separate performance obligations. The Company’s liability under these warranties is generally limited to a replacement of the product or refund of the purchase price of the product. The Company recognizes warranty costs when losses are both probable and reasonably estimable. Warranty costs were not material for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Disaggregation of Revenue
Refer to Note 7, “Reportable Segment and Geographic Information” for revenue disaggregated by primary geographical market, sales channel, and major product line.
Contract liabilities
Contract liabilities consist of advance payments from certain customers within the OEM channel for the development of additional production capacity. The current and noncurrent portions of these liabilities are included as a component of the line items, “Accrued expenses” and “Other non-current obligations,” respectively, on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.
The balance of net contract liabilities consisted of the following at March 31, 2019 and 2018 (amounts in thousands):
 
March 31, 2019
 
March 31, 2018
Contract liabilities - current (Accrued expenses)
$
256

 
$
256

Contract liabilities - noncurrent (Other non-current obligations)

 
513

Total contract liabilities
$
256

 
$
769

For the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, the Company recognized revenue of $0.9 million, $0.3 million, and $0.2 million, respectively, related to contract liabilities. Revenue related to contract liabilities is recorded on the Consolidated Statements of Operations in the line item, "Net sales."
Contract assets
The Company recognizes an asset from the costs incurred to fulfill a contract if those costs directly relate to an existing or anticipated contract or specific business opportunity, if the costs enhance our own resources that will be used in satisfying performance obligations in the future, and the costs are expected to be recovered through subsequent sale of product to the customer. The Company has determined that certain direct labor, materials, and allocations of overhead incurred within research and development activities meet the requirements to be capitalized. As most of our contracts and customer specific business opportunities do not include a stated term, the Company amortizes these capitalized costs over the expected product life cycle, which is consistent with the estimated transfer of goods to the customer. Capitalized contract costs were $1.6 million and $2.2 million at March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Capitalized contracts costs are recorded on the Consolidated Balance Sheets in the line item, “Other assets.” Amortization expense related to contract costs for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017 was $0.8 million, $0.9 million, and $0.8 million, respectively. There was no impairment loss in relation to the costs capitalized for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017. Amortization expense related to contract assets is recorded on the Consolidated Statements of Operations line item "Cost of sales."
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
The Company evaluates the collectability of trade receivables through the analysis of customer accounts. When the Company becomes aware that a specific customer has filed for bankruptcy, has begun closing or liquidation proceedings, has become insolvent or is in financial distress, the Company records a specific allowance for the doubtful account to reduce the related receivable to the amount the Company believes is collectible. If circumstances related to specific customers change, the Company’s estimates of the recoverability of receivables could be adjusted. Accounts are written off after all means of collection, including legal action, have been exhausted.
Shipping and Handling Costs
Shipping and Handling Costs
The Company’s shipping and handling costs are reflected in the line item “Cost of sales,” on the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Shipping and handling costs were $31.0 million, $21.4 million, and $16.4 million in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.
Income (Loss) per Share
Income per Share
Basic income per share is computed using the weighted-average number of shares outstanding. Diluted income per share is computed using the weighted-average number of shares outstanding adjusted for the incremental shares attributed to the warrant issued in May 2009 to K Financing, LLC by the Company (the “Platinum Warrant”) and outstanding employee stock grants if such effects are dilutive.
Grants from Governmental Agencies
Grants Income
The Company from time to time enters into contracts to perform projects in which governmental agencies agree to reimburse the Company for certain expenses incurred on the projects. The Company recognizes revenue from government grants when it is probable that the Company will comply with the conditions attached to the grant agreement and the grant proceeds will be received. Additionally, from time to time the Company receives interest free loans from governmental agencies in consideration of the Company making investments in operations in certain locations. As the loans are interest free, the Company records deferred grant income for the difference between the gross loan proceeds and the present value of the debt at the time it is issued. The deferred grant income is amortized over the life of the loans. During the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized $4.6 million and $0.8 million, respectively, as grant income within other (income) expense, net.
Environmental Cost
Environmental Cost
The Company recognizes liabilities for environmental remediation when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and can be reasonably estimated. The Company determines its liability on a site-by-site basis, and it is not discounted or reduced for anticipated recoveries from insurance carriers. In the event of anticipated insurance recoveries, such amounts would be presented on a gross basis in other current or non-current assets, as appropriate. Expenditures that extend the life of the related property or mitigate or prevent future environmental contamination are capitalized.
Derivative Financial Instruments
Derivative Financial Instruments
The Company, when deemed appropriate, uses derivatives as a risk management tool to mitigate the potential impact of certain market risks. The primary market risk managed by the Company through the use of derivative financial instruments is foreign currency exchange risk. All derivatives are carried at fair value in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. See Note 12, "Derivatives," for further discussion of derivative financial instruments.
Use of Estimates
Use of Estimates
The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) requires management to make a number of estimates and assumptions. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements. In addition, they affect the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant items subject to such estimates and assumptions include impairment of property and equipment, intangibles and goodwill, allowances for doubtful accounts, price protection and customers’ returns, deferred income taxes, and assets and obligations related to employee benefits. Actual results could differ from these estimates and assumptions.
Impact of Recently Issued Accounting Standards
Impact of Recently Issued Accounting Standards
In August 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU No. 2018-15, Customer's Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement that is a Service Contract. This ASU amends the definition of a hosting arrangement and requires a customer in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract to capitalize certain implementation costs as if the arrangement was an internal-use software project. Under this ASU, a customer will apply ASC 350-40 to determine whether to capitalize implementation costs of the cloud computing arrangement that is a service contract or expense them as incurred. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of this guidance on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.
In March 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-05, Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin (“SAB”) No. 118. The amendments in this update provide guidance on when to record and disclose provisional amounts for certain income tax effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”). The amendments also require any provisional amounts or subsequent adjustments to be included in net income from continuing operations. Additionally, this ASU discusses required disclosures that an entity must make with regard to the Act. This ASU is effective immediately as new information is available to adjust provisional amounts that were previously recorded. The Company has adopted this ASU and has finalized its accounting for the Act. See Note 11, “Income Taxes” for additional information on the Act.
In August 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-12, Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities (“ASU 2017-12”). This ASU amends and simplifies existing guidance to allow companies to more accurately present the economic effects of risk management activities in the financial statements. For cash flow hedges existing on the date of adoption, an entity is required to eliminate the separate measurement of ineffectiveness in earnings by means of a cumulative-effect adjustment to accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) with a corresponding adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings. ASU 2017-12 becomes effective for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and early adoption is permitted. In the third quarter of fiscal year 2019, the Company entered into new derivative contracts and elected to early adopt the ASU effective as of October 1, 2018. The adoption of the standard did not result in a cumulative-effect adjustment since the Company has not previously had any ineffectiveness associated with its cash flows hedges.
In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments. This ASU clarifies how cash receipts and cash payments in certain transactions are presented and classified in the statement of cash flows. The effective date of this update is for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. The update requires retrospective application to all periods presented but may be applied prospectively if retrospective application is impracticable. The Company adopted this guidance as of April 1, 2018. In connection with the adoption of this ASU, the Company elected to account for distributions received from equity method investees using the nature of distributions approach, under which distributions are classified based on the nature of activity that generated them. The other provisions of this ASU did not have an impact on the Company's Condensed Consolidated Cash Flows.
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02 (“ASU 2016-02”), Leases, as modified by ASU 2017-03, Transition and Open Effective Date Information, requiring lessees to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases. This ASU also requires expanded disclosures to help financial statement users better understand the amount, timing, and uncertainty of cash flows arising from leases. The standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years and the Company will adopt ASU 2016-02 on April 1, 2019. The Company has substantially completed its preparation for the adoption of this ASU, and the ASU is expected to have a material impact on lease assets and lease liabilities on its Consolidated Balance Sheets upon adoption. This ASU is not expected to have a material effect on the amount of expense recognized in connection with the Company's current practice. The Company plans to elect the optional transition method that will give companies the option to use the effective date as the date of initial application on transition, and as a result, we will not adjust our comparative period financial information or make the new required lease disclosures for periods before the effective date. For information about the Company's future lease commitments as of March 31, 2019, see Note 15, "Commitments and Contingencies."     
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which superseded existing GAAP for revenue recognition and created a single framework. ASU 2014-09 and its amendments were included primarily in ASC 606. The core principle of ASC 606 is that an entity should recognize revenue for the transfer of goods or services equal to an amount that it expects to be entitled to receive for those goods or services. ASC 606 also requires additional disclosures about the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgments and changes in judgments. The Company adopted the requirements of ASC 606 effective in the first quarter of fiscal year 2019, using the full retrospective method, which required us to restate each prior reporting period presented. The Company has applied practical expedient ASC 606-10-65-1(f)(3) and notes that all previously reported historical amounts are adjusted for the impact of ASC 606.
Adoption of the requirements in ASC 606 impacted our previously reported Consolidated Balance Sheet as of March 31, 2018 and our Consolidated Statements of Operations, Statements of Comprehensive Income, Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Equity, and Statements of Cash Flows for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 as follows (amounts in thousands, except per share data):
Consolidated Balance Sheet
 
As of March 31, 2018
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
Account receivable, net
$
144,076

 
$
2,485

 
$
146,561

Total current assets
676,468

 
2,485

 
678,953

Other assets
10,431

 
2,169

 
12,600

Total assets
$
1,218,269

 
$
4,654

 
$
1,222,923

Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity
 
 
 
 
 
Accrued expenses
$
122,377

 
$
2,742

 
$
125,119

Total current liabilities
284,916

 
2,742

 
287,658

Deferred income taxes
14,571

 
487

 
15,058

Other non-current obligations
151,736

 
513

 
152,249

Total liabilities
755,306

 
3,742

 
759,048

Retained earnings (deficit)
2,675

 
695

 
3,370

Accumulated other comprehensive income
(3,015
)
 
217

 
(2,798
)
Total stockholders' equity
462,963

 
912

 
463,875

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
$
1,218,269

 
$
4,654

 
$
1,222,923


Consolidated Statements of Operations
 
Fiscal Year 2018
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Net sales
$
1,199,926

 
$
255

 
$
1,200,181

Operating costs and expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of sales
859,533

 
1,211

 
860,744

Research and development
39,619

 
(505
)
 
39,114

Operating income
113,303

 
(451
)
 
112,852

Income tax expense
9,181

 
(49
)
 
9,132

Net income
$
254,529

 
$
(402
)
 
$
254,127

 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income per basic share
$
4.82

 
$
(0.01
)
 
$
4.81

Net income per diluted share
$
4.34

 
$
(0.01
)
 
$
4.33

 
Fiscal Year 2017
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Net sales
$
757,791

 
$
(453
)
 
$
757,338

Operating costs and expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of sales
570,864

 
1,080

 
571,944

Research and development
27,398

 
(705
)
 
26,693

Operating income
35,796

 
(828
)
 
34,968

Income tax expense
4,290

 
4

 
4,294

Net income
$
47,989

 
$
(832
)
 
$
47,157

 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income per basic share
$
1.03

 
$
(0.02
)
 
$
1.01

Net income per diluted share
$
0.87

 
$
(0.02
)
 
$
0.85


Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
 
Fiscal Year 2018
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Net income
$
254,529

 
$
(402
)
 
$
254,127

Foreign currency translation gains (losses)
35,054

 
217

 
35,271

Other comprehensive income
38,797

 
217

 
39,014

Total comprehensive income
$
293,326

 
$
(185
)
 
$
293,141

 
Fiscal Year 2017
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Net income
$
47,989

 
$
(832
)
 
$
47,157

Total comprehensive income
$
37,602

 
$
(832
)
 
$
36,770

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Equity
 
As of and for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2018
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Net income
$
254,529

 
$
(402
)
 
$
254,127

Retained earnings
2,675

 
695

 
3,370

Other comprehensive income
38,797

 
217

 
39,014

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
(3,015
)
 
217

 
(2,798
)
Total stockholders' equity
$
462,963

 
$
912

 
$
463,875

 
As of and for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2017
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Net income
$
47,989

 
$
(832
)
 
$
47,157

Adoption of ASU's
(333
)
 
1,929

 
1,596

Retained earnings
(251,854
)
 
1,097

 
(250,757
)
Total stockholders' equity
$
154,472

 
$
1,097

 
$
155,569


Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
 
Fiscal Year 2018
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Operating activities
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
254,529

 
$
(402
)
 
$
254,127

Depreciation and amortization
49,755

 
906

 
50,661

Change in deferred income taxes
613

 
(49
)
 
564

Other, net
(71
)
 
(609
)
 
(680
)
Accounts receivable
30,084

 
133

 
30,217

Other operating liabilities
113

 
84

 
197

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
120,860

 
(99
)
 
120,761

Effect of foreign currency fluctuations on cash
9,646

 
99

 
9,745

 
Fiscal Year 2017
 
As Previously Reported
 
ASC 606 Adjustments
 
As Adjusted
Operating activities
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
47,989

 
$
(832
)
 
$
47,157

Depreciation and amortization
37,338

 
813

 
38,151

Change in deferred income taxes
(19
)
 
4

 
(15
)
Other, net
(327
)
 
(65
)
 
(392
)
Accounts receivable
(12
)
 
(2,618
)
 
(2,630
)
Other operating liabilities
(1,068
)
 
2,762

 
1,694

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
71,667

 

 
71,667