Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Income Taxes

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Income Taxes
6 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2018
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]  
Income Taxes
Income Taxes
During the quarter ended September 30, 2018, the Company recognized $2.0 million of income tax expense, solely comprised of $2.0 million of income tax expense related to foreign operations. The $2.0 million of income tax expense related to foreign operations includes a $1.2 million expense related to the final settlement of an uncertain tax position. During the six months ended September 30, 2018, the Company recognized $6.6 million of income tax expense, comprised of $6.7 million of income tax expense related to foreign operations and $0.2 million of federal income tax expense, offset by $0.3 million of state income tax benefit. The $6.7 million of income tax expense related to foreign operations includes a $0.3 million expense related to the settlement of an uncertain tax position.
During the quarter ended September 30, 2017, the Company recognized $2.9 million of income tax expense comprised of $2.7 million of income tax expense related to foreign operations, $0.1 million of federal income tax expense, and $0.1 million of state income tax expense. During the six months ended September 30, 2017, the Company recognized $4.0 million of income tax expense, comprised of $3.6 million of income tax expense related to foreign operations, $0.2 million of federal income tax expense, and $0.2 million of state income tax expense.
The effective tax rates differ from income taxes recorded using a statutory rate largely due to the relative mix in earnings and losses in various tax jurisdictions and the usage of the net operating losses and reversal of associated valuation allowances previously recorded on the deferred tax assets.
Tax Cuts and Jobs Act
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Act reduces the US federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%, requires companies to pay a one-time transition tax on earnings of certain foreign subsidiaries that were previously tax deferred, and creates new taxes on certain foreign-sourced earnings.
The Company is applying the guidance in SAB 118 when accounting for the enactment-date effects of the Act. At September 30, 2018, the Company has not completed its accounting for all of the tax effects of the Act. In certain cases, as described below, the Company has made a reasonable estimate of certain effects of the Act. In other cases, the Company has not been able to make a reasonable estimate and continues to account for those items based on its existing accounting under ASC 740, Income Taxes, and the provisions of the tax laws that were in effect immediately prior to enactment. In all cases, the Company will continue to make and refine its calculations as additional analysis is completed. The Company’s estimates may also be affected as it gains a more thorough understanding of the tax law. These changes could be material to income tax expense.
The Company has initially determined a $0.8 million tax benefit impact related to the US federal corporate tax rate change to its existing deferred tax balances, which was included as a component of income tax expense for fiscal year 2018. The Company estimates no tax impact from the estimated transition tax repatriation charge of $75.3 million due to net operating loss utilization and a valuation allowance in the U.S. There is no impact to foreign locations. The Company is working to finalize the calculation for the one-time transition tax and in the interim we will continue to account for this item based on its existing accounting under ASC 740, Income Taxes.
Certain provisions of the Act did not impact the Company until the current fiscal year. These provisions include, but are not limited to, the base erosion anti-abuse tax (“BEAT”), the provision designed to tax global intangible low-taxed income (“GILTI”), the foreign-derived intangible income (“FDII”) provision, and the provision designed to limit interest expense deductions. Given the complexity of the new provisions, the Company continues to evaluate the impact the Act will have on the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
The Company has made sufficient progress in its calculations related to BEAT to reasonably estimate the effect on its estimated annual effective tax rate for the 2019 fiscal year. This adjustment increased the annual effective tax rate by 0.5% and will be further evaluated in future interim periods. However, the Company is still evaluating the effects of GILTI, FDII, and the provision designed to limit interest expense deductions, and the Company is not able to quantify the impact on the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements at this time. In addition, FASB Staff Q&A, Topic 740, No. 5, Accounting for GILTI, states that an entity can make an accounting policy election to either treat taxes due on the GILTI as a current period expense or factor such amounts into the measurement of its deferred taxes. Given the complexity of the GILTI provisions, the Company is still evaluating and has not yet determined its accounting policy.